The Bubble Economy: Energy, Finance and Growth

– R. U. Ayres. Support for public presentations in Cambridge, Carnegie Mellon, Washington DC, November 2014

I want to present four theses of possible interest. First, that economic theory today has not caught up with the changes in the world since Adam Smith and David Ricardo. Then externalities were comparatively rare and unusual. Today they are pervasive, thanks to urbanization, networking and globalization. The financial externalities associated with bubbles now far exceed in damage the profits to the bubble-makers.

Second, economic growth since that time has been demand driven because energy prices kept falling,– on average —  until the beginning of this century. Future growth is not guaranteed in a world of “peak oil”, and oil price bubbles. It is not certain that our grandchildren will be much richer than we are. Secular stagnation May be caused by energy constraints.

Third, the policy response by central banks – low and lower interest rates, creates the condition for the next bubble. This cannot continue.

Fourth, there is a profit opportunity approaching with a huge payoff If grasped it will kickstart growth, reduce unemployment, ameliorate the Greenhouse effect and help solve the problems of the pension funds.

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About the author:

ayres bw smallRobert Ayres’s career has focused on the application of physical ideas, especially the laws of thermodynamics, to economics; a long-standing pioneering interest in material flows and transformations (Industrial Ecology or Industrial Metabolism); and most recently to challenging held ideas on the economic theory of growth.

[More at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Ayres_(scientist)

 

 

 

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